Saturday, May 19, 2012

Google Introduces Knowledge Graph - Intelligent Search

Google introduced Knowledge Graph, a new way to handle queries that replaces keywords with objects. String of characters are treated as objects instead of merely strings.

For more than four decades, search has essentially been about matching keywords to queries. To a search engine the words [taj mahal] have been just that—two words.

But we all know that [taj mahal] has a much richer meaning. You might think of one of the world’s most beautiful monuments, or a Grammy Award-winning musician, or possibly even a casino in Atlantic City, NJ. Or, depending on when you last ate, the nearest Indian restaurant. It’s why we’ve been working on an intelligent model—in geek-speak, a “graph”—that understands real-world entities and their relationships to one another: things, not strings.

The Knowledge Graph enables you to search for things, people or places that Google knows about—landmarks, celebrities, cities, sports teams, buildings, geographical features, movies, celestial objects, works of art and more—and instantly get information that’s relevant to your query. This is a critical first step towards building the next generation of search, which taps into the collective intelligence of the web and understands the world a bit more like people do.

A search on "The Avengers" gives me the below.



Google's new result answers Microsoft's Bing newly revamped design spotting a snapshot and also one having Wolfram Alpha's computational knowledge engine layout.


Knowledge Graph is available only to U.S. English users for now.

» Introducing the Knowledge Graph: things, not strings | Official Google Blog

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